Destinations

Atiu

Atiu is an island in Southern Cook Islands. It is the third largest, third most populous, and third most visited island in the Cook Island group. It is 27km2 and has a rapidly decreasing population of 480 (2009), of which most are children and elderly.

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Mangaia

Mangaia (traditionally known as Auau Enua, which means terraced) is the most southerly of the Cook Islands and the second largest, after Rarotonga. Geologists estimate the island is at least 18 million years old, making it the oldest in the Pacific. It rises 4750 m (15,600 ft) above the ocean floor and has a land area of 51.8 km2. It has a central volcanic plateau and, like many of the southern Cook Islands, it is surrounded by a high ring of cliffs of fossil coral 60 m (200 ft) high, known as the makatea. The highest point is Rangi-motia, 169 m above sea level, near the centre of the island. Lake Tiriara is a body of fresh water in the south. The population of Mangaia comprises about 700 people (2006). The capital is the village of Oneroa, on the west coast, containing about half the population. There are two more villages, Tamarua in the south and Ivirua in the northeast.

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Mitiaro

Mitiaro, the fourth island in the Cook Islands group, is of volcanic origin, standing in water 4500 m (14,750 feet) deep. It is 6.4km (4 miles) across at its widest point. Mitiaro is part of the Nga-Pu-Toru island group formerly, a volcano that became a coral atoll. The coral died forming Makatea. The island is surrounded by the belt of fossilised coral—makatea, between 6 and 9 m high (20 and 40 feet), characteristic of islands in the southern group. The centre is almost flat, quite swampy and contains two freshwater lakes teeming with eels(Anguilla obscura) or what the locals call itiki and the imported tilapia from Africa where it is known as bream. Beaches are limited but there are crystal clear pools ideal for swimming in the subterranean limestone caves and the beach at low tide abounds in interesting marine life.

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Mauke

Mauke (also known as Maʻuke or Ma'uke) is in the Southern Cook Islands.

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Palmerston Island

Palmerston Island is a coral atoll which includes five small island groups. It is one of the Southern Cook Islands. It has no airstrip; access is by sea only. It is famed for its hospitality to traveling yachts and is sometimes compared to Pitcairn Island, as they are both remote islands supporting small English-speaking populations.

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Rarotonga

Rarotonga is by far the most populated of the Cook Islands and is the capital. It's in the southern group of islands, and is known as Raro.

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Aitutaki

Aitutaki (Aye-too-tah-ki) is an island in the Southern Cook Islands, a 45 minute flight from the capital island of Rarotonga.

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Sights

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Cook Islands

The Cook Islands are a self-governing parliamentary democracy in free association with New Zealand, located in Polynesia, in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean, between French Polynesia (Society Islands) to the east and Tonga to the west. It is an archipelago with 15 islands spread out over 2.2 million km2 of ocean. There's no land between the Cook Islands and Antarctica, though they are quite distant from each other.

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Nearby countries

Niue

Niue (Niuean: Niuē, NYOO-ay) is an island in Oceania located approximately halfway between Tonga and the Cook Islands.

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Samoa

Samoa is an island nation in the South Pacific Ocean. It is part of the region of the Pacific known as Polynesia. Its population is around 195,000 but many more Samoans live outside the country, particularly in New Zealand, Australia and the United States.

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