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Mangaia

Mangaia (traditionally known as Auau Enua, which means terraced) is the most southerly of the Cook Islands and the second largest, after Rarotonga. Geologists estimate the island is at least 18 million years old, making it the oldest in the Pacific. It rises 4750 m (15,600 ft) above the ocean floor and has a land area of 51.8 km2. It has a central volcanic plateau and, like many of the southern Cook Islands, it is surrounded by a high ring of cliffs of fossil coral 60 m (200 ft) high, known as the makatea. The highest point is Rangi-motia, 169 m above sea level, near the centre of the island. Lake Tiriara is a body of fresh water in the south. The population of Mangaia comprises about 700 people (2006). The capital is the village of Oneroa, on the west coast, containing about half the population. There are two more villages, Tamarua in the south and Ivirua in the northeast.

218km

-21.921389-157.923056

Atiu

Atiu is an island in Southern Cook Islands. It is the third largest, third most populous, and third most visited island in the Cook Island group. It is 27km2 and has a rapidly decreasing population of 480 (2009), of which most are children and elderly.

226km

-19.983333-158.116667

Aitutaki

Aitutaki (Aye-too-tah-ki) is an island in the Southern Cook Islands, a 45 minute flight from the capital island of Rarotonga.

251km

-18.83-159.75

Palmerston Island

Palmerston Island is a coral atoll which includes five small island groups. It is one of the Southern Cook Islands. It has no airstrip; access is by sea only. It is famed for its hospitality to traveling yachts and is sometimes compared to Pitcairn Island, as they are both remote islands supporting small English-speaking populations.

501km

-18.0667-163.1667
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Rarotonga

Cook Islands
Rarotonga is by far the most populated of the Cook Islands and is the capital. It's in the southern group of islands, and is known as Raro.

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