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Quito

capital city of Ecuador

64km

-0.25-78.5833

Cotopaxi

stratovolcano in the Andes Mountains

103km

-0.68055556-78.43777778

Esmeraldas

Ecuador

174km

0.95-79.666667
Sights

Cuicocha

lake in Ecuador

11km

0.3-78.35

Pululahua Geobotanical Reserve

Pululahua Geobotanical Reserve is 17 km north of Quito in the province of Pichincha of Ecuador.

30km

0.0381-78.4631

Ciudad Mitad del Mundo

Just outside of Quito is where the measurements were first made that proved that the shape of the Earth is in fact an oblate spheroid. Commemorating this is a large monument that straddles the equator called Mitad del Mundo or middle of the world. The entrance for the park is $3.50 (included entrance to small museums - April 2016). Visit here if you're interested in learning some alternative facts and seeing some kitsch. Because it's not on the equator itself, and it's not a serious cultural or educational experience. No, the water doesn't really go down the plughole the opposite way in the hemispheres, and if you want to take it seriously you won't enjoy your time here. For some of the attractions like the planetarium, the price is $7.50. You can also go to the IntiƱan Solar Museum which is right next to the monument, on the other side of the north fence. The museum is actually on the equator. For $4 you can have a tour of this little museum.

33km

-0.00222222-78.45583333

Mindo, Ecuador

rural area in Pichincha, Ecuador

65km

-0.05119167-78.77830278

we will see

Otavalo

Ecuador
Otavalo is a small town in Ecuador. It has about 50,000 inhabitants and is the capital of the canton of the same name. Otavalo is world-famous for its indigenous population, the Otavalos, many of which are travelling around the world to sell their famous handicrafts or play in Andean Folk music groups. The Otavalos are considered the economically most successful indigenous group of Latin America, and many of the grandest houses and largest pick-up trucks in Otavalo are owned by Otavalos. However, a great percentage of the Otavalos, especially in the surrounding villages, live in poverty and are victims of racial discrimination. Otavalos are easily recognized by their traditional dress: white pants and a dark poncho for men; a dark skirt and a white blouse with colourful embroidery and colourful waisteband for women. Both sexes wear their hair long (the men usually platted).

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