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Manchester

major city in Greater Manchester, England, UK

81km

53.48-2.25

Skipton

Skipton is an historical town in the English county of North Yorkshire, forming the southern gateway to the Yorkshire Dales.

113km

53.962-2.017

Evesham

Evesham is a small market town in Worcestershire situated roughly equidistant from Worcester, Cheltenham & Stratford-upon-Avon and in the Vale of Evesham.

145km

52.09-1.95

Somerset (England)

ceremonial county of England (use Q21694741 for administrative non-metropolitan county)

151km

51.18-3

Bath

city in Somerset, England, United Kingdom

154km

51.38-2.36

Glasgow

city in Scotland, UK

212km

55.86458-4.26655

Belfast

city of the United Kingdom, capital of Northern Ireland

336km

54.597-5.93

Dublin

capital city of Ireland

364km

53.3411-6.2633
Sights

Bluecoat Chambers

The Bluecoat is the oldest Grade 1 listed building in Liverpool’s city centre, dating back to 1717. Following a £14.5 million redevelopment, it re-opened in March 2008 with a new wing of galleries and a state-of-the-art performance space. It showcases talent across artistic disciplines including visual art, music, literature, dance and live art. It helps nurture new talent by providing studio spaces for artists.

446m

53.4042-2.9839

World Museum

This is a fine building and well worth a visit. It contains an excellent collection of British rocketry exhibits, as well as the best Egyptological collection outside London.

476m

53.409992-2.981323

Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool

theatre in Liverpool, England

515m

53.4074-2.9813

Liverpool Town Hall

Built in 1754, the Official Residence of Liverpool's Lord Mayor is an elegant stone building, having two fronts; one towards Castle Street, the other towards the area formed by the New Exchange Buildings. Each front consists of an elegant range of Corinthian columns, supporting a pediment, and are themselves supported by a rustic base. Between the capitals are heads, and emblems of commerce in basso-relievo; and on the pediment of the grand front is a noble piece of sculpture representing Commerce committing her treasures to the race of Neptune.

700m

53.4071-2.9916

Gustav Adolf Church, Liverpool

721m

53.3996-2.9844

Foundation for Art and Creative Technology

Offers exhibitions, film and participant-led art projects. The building is home to three galleries (showing four exhibitions per year), a beautiful café operated by the team behind LEAF on Bold Street, a cosy bar and four film screens.

1.0km

53.4022-2.9778

Church of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas, Liverpool

This is the city's parish church and home to the third Liver Bird (there are in fact three of them, not two).

1.0km

53.407-2.9948

Royal Liver Building

Iconic symbol of Liverpool waterfront. This 1911 skyscraper still dominates the distinctive Liverpool skyline. It is the home of the legendary Liver Birds that sit on top of the building looking out across to the Wirral. The river-facing face of the clock is six feet larger in diameter than that of the clock tower at Westminster.

1.2km

53.4058-2.9958

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Catholic. Affectionately known by the locals as Paddy's Wigwam or "the Pope's launching pad". Visit on a sunny day as the stained glass ceiling looks fantastic!

1.9km

53.4047-2.9688

Saint Philip Neri Church

Byzantine inspired design, built between 1914 and 1920

2.0km

53.399-2.969

St Bride's Church, Liverpool

2.0km

53.397-2.969

Greek Orthodox Church of St Nicholas, Toxteth

Dedicated to St Nicholas the patron saint of seafarers. Built between 1865 and 1870, it was the second purpose built Greek Orthodox Church in England. The architecture of the building is a typical example of the Byzantine style as used in many Eastern Greek Churches. A typical feature is the four domes of the building. Henry Summers, a master builder who built many fine buildings in the city, was commissioned to build the church.

2.3km

53.3954-2.9671

Goodison Park

Everton play in the Premier League, the top tier of English football, and their women's team plays in the Women's Super League. The men are one of the oldest football clubs in England; their fans are known as "Toffees". They play at Goodison Park, capacity 40,000, 2 miles north of city centre.

2.9km

53.43888889-2.96638889

Anfield

Liverpool play in the Premier League, the top tier of English football, and their women's team plays in the Women's Super League. The men are one of the most successful clubs in the country, having won six European Cups. Their fans are famous the world over for the unique atmosphere they create at Anfield and the singing of "You'll Never Walk Alone" on match days. Matches against Manchester United and against Everton are especially intense affairs with near-capacity crowds. Anfield has a capacity of 54,000.

3.1km

53.43082778-2.96084722

Birkenhead

town in Merseyside, England

3.4km

53.393-3.014

Wavertree Botanic Gardens

4.9km

53.406-2.942

Aintree Racecourse

This course is renowned as home of the Grand National, the most formidable jumps race in the world, held in April each year. (Liverpool is mobbed when it's on.) They hold other jumps races in winter, but few recently, as the grandstand was being rebuilt. Now this is complete, there will presumably be an expanded race programme at Aintree, but this hasn't yet been announced.

6.6km

53.47694444-2.94166667

Aintree

village in Aintree Village civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton, Merseyside

7.1km

53.4793-2.9373

Sudley House

An art gallery which contains the collection of George Holt in its original setting. It includes work by Thomas Gainsborough, Joshua Reynolds, Edwin Landseer and J. M. W. Turner.

7.5km

53.3735-2.9214

Croxteth Hall

This is one of Liverpool's most important heritage sites, one of "the finest working country estates in the North West" and was the winner of the European Capital of Culture 2008. The park is at the heart of what was once a great country estate stretching hundreds of square miles and was the ancestral home of the Molyneux family, the Earls of Sefton. After the death of the last Earl it was given to the City of Liverpool. The estate has four main attractions - The Historic Hall, Croxteth Home Farm, the Victorian Walled Garden and a 500-acre country park including the new Croxteth Local Nature Reserve. A new addition to what's on offer at Croxteth is the West Derby Courthouse. Dating from the reign of Elizabeth I, this is one of the oldest public buildings in Liverpool.

10km

53.442-2.891

Southport

town in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton, England

15km

53.6475-3.00527778

Chester

city in Cheshire, England

18km

53.19-2.89

Blackpool

town in Lancashire, England

27km

53.81416667-3.05027778

Lancashire

ceremonial county in North-West England (use Q21279371 for administrative non-metropolitan county)

49km

53.8-2.6

Lake District

mountainous region in North West England

74km

54.5-3.16666667

Ironbridge

village in Shropshire, England

76km

52.6277-2.485

Cumbria

county in England

77km

54.5-3.25

Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway

Heritage Railway in Sussex

77km

54.355-3.408

Kidsgrove

town in Staffordshire UK

84km

53.0874-2.2478

Gritstone Trail

93km

53.16277778-2.15444444

Bowness-on-Solway

a village located in Bowness, United Kingdom

103km

54.95-3.216

Lyme Park

Grade I listed historic house museum in Cheshire East, United Kingdom

103km

53.3381-2.0548

Machynlleth

town in Powys, Wales

110km

52.591-3.849

Monmouthshire

principal area in south-east Wales

110km

51.78333333-2.86666667

Brecon Beacons

mountain range in South Wales, UK

114km

51.88333333-3.43333333

Yorkshire Dales

upland area of the Pennines in Northern England

114km

54.26666667-2.08333333

Buxton

town in Derbyshire, England

119km

53.259-1.911

Castell y Bere

castle

120km

52.65818-3.9715

Tintern

village in the United Kingdom

120km

51.69677-2.68142

Taff Trail

122km

51.6964-3.3471

South Wales

region of Wales

124km

51.68333333-3.38333333

Housesteads Roman Fort

The most famous sight on the Wall, Housesteads is the most complete Roman fort in Britain, and one of the best-preserved in Europe. English Heritage are in the process of improving the visitors' centre, replacing the rather small museum.

127km

55.013-2.331

Llanberis

village in Wales

128km

53.119-4.131

Harlech

town, community and seaside resort in Gwynedd, within the historical boundaries of Meirionnydd in northwest Wales

129km

52.86-4.105

Edale

village and civil parish in High Peak, Derbyshire, England

130km

53.366-1.816

Aberdyfi

village, community and seaside resort in Wales

131km

52.544-4.044

Rocester

village in the United Kingdom

131km

52.951-1.838

Porthmadog

town and community in Wales, Britain

131km

52.927-4.132

Bute Park

park in Cardiff, Wales

132km

51.489-3.189

Cathays Park

Pronounced "kut-AYS, it is the prominent civic centre, comprising expensive white Portland stone buildings in a range of classical styles, all surrounding the formal gardens of Alexandra Gardens whose centre contains national war memorial of Wales.

132km

51.4866-3.1804

City Hall, Cardiff

The domed roof of City Hall topped by a dragon is one of the landmarks of Cardiff city centre. Dating from the start of the 20th century, it is built of beautiful white Portland stone and surmounted by many statues. Inside, the marble hall is dominated by statues of Welsh heroes, the main hall has large bronze chandeliers and the main debating chamber sits under the dome. Open to visitors, events may prevent you from seeing all the rooms but a must-see.

132km

51.48504-3.17857

New Theatre, Cardiff

West End shows.

132km

51.483662-3.175532

St David's Hall

Symphony hall used for orchestral concerts, recitals and other live music and comedy, host the Cardiff singer of the world competition, the world's premier singing competition.

132km

51.48027778-3.17666667

Cardiff Story Museum

The Hayes. This is the museum of Cardiff's history, located in the Old Library building, which it shares with the tourist information centre.

132km

51.479753-3.176851

Clwb Ifor Bach

nightclub in Cardiff

132km

51.48056-3.1814

Cardiff International Arena

indoor exhibition centre and events arena located in Cardiff, Wales

132km

51.4778-3.1715

The Point, Cardiff

A church-turned-popular music venue in Cardiff Bay. The Point is situated in the old merchant's quarter of Mount Stuart Square. The square was named after Lord Mount Stuart, who represented Wales in Parliament during the Napoleonic period. The focal point of the square was St. Stephens, constructed around 1900, that would later be turned into The Point.

133km

51.465-3.168

Pierhead Building

Sits between the ultra modern Millennium centre and Senedd as a strong contrast and link to Cardiff's glorious past. Covered in dragons and heraldry used for permanent and temporary exhibitions about Cardiff's development, and that of the docks.

133km

51.463526-3.163412

Cardiff Bay

bay and area created by the Cardiff Barrage in South Cardiff, Wales

133km

51.463-3.164

Norwegian Church, Cardiff

It was established in Cardiff Bay to serve the large community of Norwegian sailors working in the docks. The main claim to fame of its original location is as the place where the author Roald Dahl was christened. Today it is a cafe and art gallery.

133km

51.46143-3.16192

St Fagans

community in the west of the city of Cardiff, Wales

134km

51.487-3.268

St Fagans Castle

Elizabethan manor house in St Fagans, Cardiff

134km

51.4859-3.2677

St Fagans National Museum of History

Free admission (£5 car park charge). Known universally as St Fagans (pronounced "FAG-uns"), after the village it's in, this was named the UK's favourite visitor attraction by Which? magazine in 2011, and is easily Wales's most popular. An open-air museum of buildings rebuilt, stone by stone, from all parts of Wales, built in the grounds of St Fagans Castle, an Elizabethan manor house which is also free to wander around. The Castle gardens, dating from the 19th century, are especially beautiful. You may not be able to see everything in a single visit due to the size of the grounds. Great for kids, the bus ride from/to central Cardiff is very pretty.

134km

51.4869-3.2725

Talyllyn Railway

preserved narrow gauge railway in Wales, UK

134km

52.583647-4.088783

Tywyn

town and seaside resort on the Cardigan Bay coast of southern Gwynedd, Wales

134km

52.582-4.089

Caerau Hillfort

A Norman ringwork castle within an older Iron Age hillfort (as at Caer Penrhos). Much of the site has been overgrown with vegetation.

134km

51.4672-3.2483

Saltaire

Victorian model village located in Shipley, City of Bradford Metropolitan District, West Yorkshire, England

135km

53.83722222-1.79027778

Leigh Woods National Nature Reserve

A wilderness of beauty and tranquility set against the breathtaking backdrop of the Avon Gorge and Brunel's world famous suspension bridge (National Trust).

137km

51.4631-2.6392

Bristol Zoo

It is the 5th oldest zoo in the world and the oldest outside of a capital city. It was awarded ‘Zoo of the Year 2004’ by the Good Britain Guide.

137km

51.46333333-2.62222222

Clifton Observatory

The Downs provide a huge open space within Bristol, with great views over the Avon Gorge and the suspension bridge. On top of the downs, right by the bridge is the Observatory, housing a camera obscura and a cave leading down towards an observation point within the 250-foot sheer cliff face of the gorge.

138km

51.45663-2.6264

Ashton Court

850 acres (340 hectares) city park, less than 2 mi (3.2 km) from the city centre, with a mix of meadow, woodland, deer park, golf course, site of the Balloon Fiesta, the KIte Festival and the former Ashton Court Festival.

138km

51.4479-2.6446

Clifton Suspension Bridge

bridge spanning the Avon Gorge and the River Avon

138km

51.4549-2.6279

Clifton Cathedral

A striking modernist design completed in 1973, with an equally modern interior and spire. It is constructed of reinforced concrete faced with granite. Worth a look.

138km

51.4597-2.6163

The Lido, Bristol

A Grade II* listed building. The Lido and pub are separately managed, the historic Lido having closed in 1989, completely refurbished and reopened in 2008. The Victoria freehouse pub stands in one corner of the site; it was created in 1851 to provide the funds to rescue the Lido the first time, and was saved from closure in 2006.

138km

51.4589-2.6117

Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery

Bristol's major museum and art gallery houses an outstanding and diverse range of objects, from sea dinosaurs to magnificent art. A visit to the region's largest museum and art gallery is guaranteed to inspire! A range of subjects can be found. From Archaeology to History and Art. It also has a cafe.

139km

51.4561-2.6053

Cabot Tower, Bristol

This dramatic Victorian tower occupies a prominent hilltop in Brandon Hill park, seen from much of the city. If you climb up the spiral staircase, you get a great view of the whole city from the top. There are signs which show you what you are looking at. It's a great way to get acquainted with the city and oriented to where you are.

139km

51.454-2.6068

St Werburghs

The alternative quarter and a green oasis in the heart of the city. Filled with allotments, a city farm, eco-housing and lively pubs including the award-winning The Duke of York in Jubilee Road and The Miner's Arms in Mina Road. The most recent addition to the area is the multi-million pound Eastgate Oriental City complex which features a large Chinese supermarket and Chinese restaurant.

139km

51.47-2.576

Brandon Hill, Bristol

This attractive and hilly park is worth visiting, if only for the views over Bristol from the hill-top. Even better views can be gained by climbing the narrow spiral staircase within the Cabot Tower atop the hill. Open every day from 8AM to 30 min before dusk. The tower is now open again after being closed for significant structural maintenance.

139km

51.45291-2.6068

St Pauls, Bristol

The Afro-Caribbean centre of Bristol and home to the world famous St Pauls Carnival. It still suffers from the negative reputation of having been home of the St Pauls riots over 25 years ago but visitors today will find it a colourful, friendly area with fantastic reggae pubs and clubs and a great street art scene. Host to an Asian supermarket on Ashley Road next door to Teoh's pan-Asian cafe.

139km

51.4656-2.582

Red Lodge Museum, Bristol

The house was built in 1590 and then altered in 1730. It has fine oak panelling and carved stone chimney pieces and is furnished in the style of both periods. The garden has now been laid out in Elizabethan style.

139km

51.455556-2.599583

Georgian House, Bristol

Built for merchant and plantation owner John Pinney in 1790, also the former home of Pero Jones, a slave brought to Bristol from Nevis, by Pinney. It is displayed as it might have looked in the 18th century and provides an insight into life above and below stairs. Free. The book Pero, the Life of a Slave in Eighteenth-Century Bristol (C Eickelmann and D Small) is for sale at the museum.

139km

51.4526-2.6044

SS Great Britain

The world's first iron hulled, screw propeller-driven, steam-powered passenger liner, built by Brunel in 1843 and now preserved in a dry-dock alongside the floating harbour. Winner of the Gulbenkian Prize for Museum of the Year 2006 - the biggest arts prize in the U.K. The "Being Brunel" exhibition alongside opened in 2018 and is included in the ticket price.

139km

51.4492-2.6084

Bristol Cathedral

Built as the abbey of St Augustine founded in the Norman era, and extensively rebuilt in the 16th and 19th centuries. The seat of the diocese of Bristol.

139km

51.4517-2.6007

St Nicholas Market

All under a glass arcade and is a great place to grab some deliciously different and cheap food. Choices include, local cheeses, The Bristol Sausage shop, famous Pie Minister Pies, and food from around the world such as Portuguese, Italian, Moroccan or Caribbean and Turkish.

139km

51.4544-2.5935

The Exchange, Bristol

The Palladian Corn Exchange, built in 1743, boasts a clock on its frontage that ingeniously tells time both in the new-fangled GMT and the old Bristol time. In front are nails (in reality Bronze pillars) over which the local merchants did business; from these come the expression 'cash on the nail'.

139km

51.4544-2.5935

Great Bristol Half Marathon

139km

51.4508-2.5986

St Peter's Church, Castle Park, Bristol

It is difficult to imagine now, but this large harbour-side park was a network of busy streets and shops until it was bombed out during the second world war. Within the park are the excavated ruins of Bristol Castle, and the ruined St Peter's Church preserved as it stood after the bombing as a memorial to those killed.

139km

51.4553-2.5897

Pero's Bridge

Bridge over the Harbour, known for the iconic counter weights of the lifting section which resemble the shape of movie character Shrek, hence its popular name with the locals. Its formal name Pero's Bridge is a reference to Pero Jones, a Caribbean slave who arrived in Bristol through the harbour channel below the bridge in the 18th. Although the bridges hydraulic mechanism allows it to open and close swiftly, it only does so rarely because the ferry was designed explicitly to pass under the bridge without it needing to be lifted.

139km

51.4501-2.5979

King Street, Bristol

King Street is now the heart of Bristol's theatre-land (see 'Old Vic' below) but it once lead down to the docks at Welsh Back, where the old sailing trows (a type of sailing barge) used to dock after their journeys from South Wales. The street has changed little since those days, and the Llandoger Trow pub dates back to 1663. It is rumoured to have been patronised by pirates of old, and by Robert Louis Stevenson whilst writing Treasure Island.

139km

51.4518-2.5946

Llandoger Trow

pub in Bristol, UK

139km

51.4519-2.5932

Queen Square, Bristol

A 2.4 ha garden square in the center, originally laid out outside Bristol's city walls in an area known as the Town Marsh. Its planning started in 1699 and construction finished in 1727, being named after Queen Anne. It has seen a turbulent history, with much of the north and west side buildings being destroyed during the riots of 1831 and subsequently rebuilt. From 1937 to 1992 the square was scarred by a dual carriageway road crossing it diagonally, which created a lot of traffic to flow through the area. After this became unbearable by the 90s, the road was closed and demolished by the late 90s, and the garden restored to its pre 1937 glory. Although originally a residential neighborhood, the buildings surrounding the square are nowadays used as offices, and many are listed under heritage protection. The center of the square hosts the iconic statue of William III, a sculpture by John Michael Rysbrack who cast it in 1733 in brass and erected it in 1736 to signify the city's loyalty.

139km

51.4505-2.595

M Shed

History of Bristol

139km

51.4473-2.5986

Monsal Trail

139km

53.2447-1.7317

Barry Island

Welsh peninsula

140km

51.392-3.27483333

Cilurnum

A former Roman cavalry fort, Chesters has a fairly extensive - if rather old-fashioned - museum including exhibits excavated at Housesteads and elsewhere.

141km

55.026-2.139

Bristol (Whitchurch) Airport

Former airport of Bristol, operating from 1930 until 1957. It played an important role during the Second World War as air bridge between the UK and neutral Portugal, and other territories such as Gibraltar. From the early 1950s the airport became too small to accommodate scheduled services, and expansion was limited by surrounding housing estates. It remained in use for some years for short flights to the Channel Islands, Isle of Wight and the Isle of Man, but flying ceased from 1957 onward. It was reopened in 1959 as a racing circuit, but most of the former airport grounds have been redeveloped since. The main runway still exists and can be visited.

142km

51.41277778-2.58638889

Caernarfon

town and port in Gwynedd, Wales

143km

53.14-4.27

Bakewell

town and civil parish in Derbyshire Dales district, Derbyshire, England

146km

53.213-1.6759

we will see

Liverpool

United Kingdom
Liverpool is a city in Merseyside, England, within the historic county boundaries of Lancashire, famed for its football teams, the Grand National horse race, music, vibrant nightlife and its links with the arts and culture.

What's on your mind?

Climate

Average temperatures

Jan

7.2°C2.4
Precipitation: 74.9 mm

Feb

7.3°C2.1
Precipitation: 54.4 mm

Mar

9.4°C3.8
Precipitation: 63.6 mm

Apr

12.2°C5.1
Precipitation: 54.3 mm

May

15.6°C7.9
Precipitation: 54.9 mm

Jun

17.9°C11.1
Precipitation: 66.2 mm

Jul

19.7°C13.3
Precipitation: 59 mm

Aug

19.4°C13.2
Precipitation: 68.9 mm

Sep

17.3°C11
Precipitation: 71.7 mm

Oct

13.9°C8.2
Precipitation: 97.3 mm

Nov

10.2°C5.2
Precipitation: 82.6 mm

Dec

7.5°C2.5
Precipitation: 88.8 mm