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Wimborne Minster

Wimbourne is a small town in Dorset, England. The Minster, which is a beautiful large church, has existed for over 1300 years and is recognised for its unusual chained library.

22km

50.804-1.978

Poole

Poole is in Dorset, on the south coast of England.

22km

50.71666667-1.98333333

Southampton

Southampton is a port city on England's South East coast. It was the departure point for many trans-Atlantic crossings, perhaps most famously including the ill-fated maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic.

43km

50.9098-1.4044

Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight is an island and county five miles off the southern coast of England. It is easily and quickly accessible by multiple sea routes from the mainland cities of Southampton and Portsmouth. The island has long been an excellent place for an upmarket but traditional seaside holiday, with beaches and towns that were very popular in Victorian times. It is now also becoming a must-visit destination for young people seeking watersports and outdoor activities generally. Cowes is a famous yachting centre and attracts the 'London set' together with members of the worldwide sailing fraternity during Cowes Week in August. The island has a similar atmosphere to Guernsey or Jersey yet is much closer to the mainland and is three times the size. It has a population of 138,000. Despite being only 6 miles across the sea from Portsmouth and 15 miles from Southampton it is a world apart in terms of scenery, culture and pace of life. Known as "England In Miniature" it offers an incredible variety with the landscape changing dramatically in the space of a few miles and each town and village offering something different. Beaches are fantastic and the water quality is good.

52km

50.67-1.31

Hampshire

Stretching from the New Forest's coastal beaches in the south west, to London's suburban fringe in the north east, Hampshire is the largest county in South East England. Known as Jane Austen's County after its most famous daughter, Hampshire has a wealth of attractions to offer the traveller. Visitors may see one of England's greatest cathedrals in Winchester, ascend to the top of the South's tallest landmark in Portsmouth or fish for trout in crystal clear chalk rivers.

57km

51.0577-1.3081

Winchester (England)

city in Hampshire, England

57km

51.0632-1.308

Dorset

Dorset is a county on the south coast of England, in the West Country.

61km

50.8333-2.3333

Newbury and Thatcham

civil parish and town in Berkshire, England

69km

51.4009-1.3235

Dorchester

town in West Dorset in Dorset, United Kingdom

73km

50.71141-2.4412

Portsmouth

Portsmouth (pronounced "ports-muth" and nicknamed "Pompey") is a large city in the county of Hampshire, on the south coast of England. Portsmouth plays a major role in British history, especially naval history. Its rich heritage offers a variety of attractions, including the Historical Dockyard, which houses some of the most historical warships in the world – HMS Victory, Lord Nelson's flagship used at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, and the Mary Rose, a Tudor-era warship. Portsmouth has two cathedrals, including the Romanesque Portsmouth Cathedral, 12 museums, most of which are free, and two theatres. The city offers excellent shopping facilities in the Gunwharf Quays complex, home to a variety of designer stores including Ralph Lauren, Hugo Boss and Barbour, as well as the striking 557 ft (170 m) landmark Spinnaker Tower, which offers excellent views of the Solent and City.

76km

50.793-1.0916

Bath

city in Somerset, England, United Kingdom

78km

51.38-2.36

Cherbourg

Cherbourg is a port town at the north end of the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy, France.

80km

49.633-1.6167

Witney

Witney is a thriving market town in Oxfordshire, just off the A40 Cheltenham to Oxford road. Like many towns in the Cotswolds, Witney is known historically for its textiles specifically woolen blankets.

80km

51.785-1.486

Abingdon

market town and civil parish in Vale of White Horse, Oxfordshire, England, UK

85km

51.666-1.282

Oxford

Oxford is the oldest university city in the United Kingdom, some 50 miles (80 km) to the west of the capital London in its own county of Oxfordshire, on the rivers Thames and Cherwell. Together with Cambridge (the second oldest university city and Oxford's great rival), Oxford has long represented the English academic establishment and elite ("Oxbridge"), a haven of tradition and endeavour. Oxford's famous "Dreaming Spires" refer to the medieval churches and colleges that dominate the bustling modern town in all their Gothic splendour. Picturesque architecture and a vibrant modern life, driven by students, light industry and technology, all set in the rolling countryside of Oxfordshire, make this a great destination.

91km

51.7518-1.2553

Evesham

Evesham is a small market town in Worcestershire situated roughly equidistant from Worcester, Cheltenham & Stratford-upon-Avon and in the Vale of Evesham.

96km

52.09-1.95

Stratford-upon-Avon

Stratford-upon-Avon is an historic town on the River Avon in the English county of Warwickshire, best known as the home town of the great English playwright and poet, William Shakespeare. Today, it is a major theatre-going destination as the home of the Royal Shakespeare Company. As such, it represents one of the most popular tourist destinations in the country.

101km

52.1914-1.711

Bristol

city in South West England

103km

51.45561-2.59455

Banbury

Banbury is a market town in the Cherwell district of Oxfordshire. It is known for the nursery rhyme - "Ride-a-cock-horse" and Banbury cakes. The local football team is Banbury United, they play at the Spencer stadium.

104km

52.0632-1.3396

Bicester

Bicester is a market town located in the north-east of the English county of Oxfordshire, some miles north of the university town of Oxford. It has become a popular destination on account of its being the location of Bicester Village, a large factory and designer outlet shopping village.

107km

51.9-1.15

Warwick (England)

the county town of Warwickshire, England

109km

52.28-1.59

Chichester

Chichester is a cathedral city in West Sussex, on England's South East coast.

111km

50.83652-0.77918

Channel Islands

The Channel Islands are located just off the coast of France mainly in the Bay of St Malo. They are Crown Dependencies of the United Kingdom, which means that they are self-governing in all respects except for defence and foreign affairs, which are the responsibility of the UK government.

117km

49.3359-2.3346

Birmingham (England)

major city in England

121km

52.48-1.89

Haslemere

Haslemere is a town in Surrey.

121km

51.0872-0.7101

High Wycombe

High Wycombe is a hilly town in the county of Buckinghamshire in England.

130km

51.628661-0.748238

Somerset (England)

ceremonial county of England (use Q21694741 for administrative non-metropolitan county)

139km

51.18-3

Chertsey

Chertsey is a town in Surrey.

148km

51.3902-0.5074

Worthing

Worthing is the largest town in West Sussex, around 100 km south of London and 18 km or so along the coast from Brighton. The town lies nestled between the English Channel and the South Downs National Park. Since the 19th century it has been nicknamed 'Sunny Worthing' thanks to its reputedly sunny and mild microclimate.

156km

50.81-0.374

Bayeux

Bayeux is a small town in northern France within Lower Normandy. Bayeux is best known for the remarkable Bayeux Tapestry that chronicles in visual form the conquest of England by William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, in 1066.

158km

49.2794-0.7028

Nantes

city in Loire-Atlantique, France

257km

47.2181-1.5528
Sights

Bournemouth

town in the ceremonial county of Dorset, England

11km

50.72-1.88

Salisbury

cathedral city in Wiltshire, England

24km

51.074-1.7936

New Forest

The New Forest is a major tourist area and a national park in Hampshire. It is immensely popular with British campers, as it is one of two national parks in the densely populated South East of England.

25km

50.86666667-1.56666667

Normanton Down Barrows

31km

51.17-1.83

Bush Barrow

archaeological site in England

31km

51.17051-1.834819

Corfe Castle

31km

50.64-2.058

Woodhenge

A contemporary monument to Stonehenge, Woodhenge was a series of timbers erected in oval rings, and like Stonehenge is aligned to the rising sun on the summer solstice. The old timber postholes are now marked with small concrete plinths (although there are plans to reconstruct the timbers as they may have looked), and although short on information the site offers a peaceful location away from the crowds at Stonehenge.

32km

51.1894-1.78576

Stonehenge Cursus

Neolithic cursus monument

32km

51.186-1.826

Durrington Walls

Just north of Woodhenge, Durrington Walls has been revealed as the site of a great Neolithic village, and likely home of several religious activities. The walls are the remains of the largest henge (earthworks) monument in the UK - some 500 m in diameter.

32km

51.1925-1.786667

Wiltshire

ceremonial county of England (use Q21694746 for administrative unitary authority)

44km

51.33333333-1.91666667

Wiltshire Museum

museum in Devizes, England

49km

51.35-1.993

Avebury

Neolithic henge monument

49km

51.42861111-1.85416667

Devizes

town in Wiltshire, England

49km

51.353-1.994

Lulworth

52km

50.6208-2.2498

Bradford-on-Avon

town in Wiltshire, England, UK

67km

51.347-2.251

Fort Nelson, Hampshire

Grade I listed military museum in the United Kingdom

71km

50.861-1.1389

Portsmouth Historic Dockyard

area of HM Naval Base Portsmouth

74km

50.801-1.11

Portsdown Hill

mountain in United Kingdom

74km

50.85822-1.11055

Gunwharf Quays

Shopping District

75km

50.7949-1.1058

Domus Dei

church in the United Kingdom

75km

50.788967-1.103943

Portsmouth City Museum

Portsmouth Museum is a local museum in Museum Road in the city of Portsmouth, southern England.

75km

50.791636-1.097743

Southsea

town in Hampshire, England

79km

50.785-1.07

Cotswolds

protected area in south central England

79km

51.8-2.03333333

Portsmouth F.C.

Association football club

79km

50.79638889-1.06388889

Bristol (Whitchurch) Airport

Former airport of Bristol, operating from 1930 until 1957. It played an important role during the Second World War as air bridge between the UK and neutral Portugal, and other territories such as Gibraltar. From the early 1950s the airport became too small to accommodate scheduled services, and expansion was limited by surrounding housing estates. It remained in use for some years for short flights to the Channel Islands, Isle of Wight and the Isle of Man, but flying ceased from 1957 onward. It was reopened in 1959 as a racing circuit, but most of the former airport grounds have been redeveloped since. The main runway still exists and can be visited.

101km

51.41277778-2.58638889

St Werburghs

The alternative quarter and a green oasis in the heart of the city. Filled with allotments, a city farm, eco-housing and lively pubs including the award-winning The Duke of York in Jubilee Road and The Miner's Arms in Mina Road. The most recent addition to the area is the multi-million pound Eastgate Oriental City complex which features a large Chinese supermarket and Chinese restaurant.

102km

51.47-2.576

St Pauls, Bristol

The Afro-Caribbean centre of Bristol and home to the world famous St Pauls Carnival. It still suffers from the negative reputation of having been home of the St Pauls riots over 25 years ago but visitors today will find it a colourful, friendly area with fantastic reggae pubs and clubs and a great street art scene. Host to an Asian supermarket on Ashley Road next door to Teoh's pan-Asian cafe.

102km

51.4656-2.582

St Peter's Church, Castle Park, Bristol

It is difficult to imagine now, but this large harbour-side park was a network of busy streets and shops until it was bombed out during the second world war. Within the park are the excavated ruins of Bristol Castle, and the ruined St Peter's Church preserved as it stood after the bombing as a memorial to those killed.

103km

51.4553-2.5897

Llandoger Trow

pub in Bristol, UK

103km

51.4519-2.5932

The Exchange, Bristol

The Palladian Corn Exchange, built in 1743, boasts a clock on its frontage that ingeniously tells time both in the new-fangled GMT and the old Bristol time. In front are nails (in reality Bronze pillars) over which the local merchants did business; from these come the expression 'cash on the nail'.

103km

51.4544-2.5935

St Nicholas Market

All under a glass arcade and is a great place to grab some deliciously different and cheap food. Choices include, local cheeses, The Bristol Sausage shop, famous Pie Minister Pies, and food from around the world such as Portuguese, Italian, Moroccan or Caribbean and Turkish.

103km

51.4544-2.5935

Queen Square, Bristol

A 2.4 ha garden square in the center, originally laid out outside Bristol's city walls in an area known as the Town Marsh. Its planning started in 1699 and construction finished in 1727, being named after Queen Anne. It has seen a turbulent history, with much of the north and west side buildings being destroyed during the riots of 1831 and subsequently rebuilt. From 1937 to 1992 the square was scarred by a dual carriageway road crossing it diagonally, which created a lot of traffic to flow through the area. After this became unbearable by the 90s, the road was closed and demolished by the late 90s, and the garden restored to its pre 1937 glory. Although originally a residential neighborhood, the buildings surrounding the square are nowadays used as offices, and many are listed under heritage protection. The center of the square hosts the iconic statue of William III, a sculpture by John Michael Rysbrack who cast it in 1733 in brass and erected it in 1736 to signify the city's loyalty.

103km

51.4505-2.595

King Street, Bristol

King Street is now the heart of Bristol's theatre-land (see 'Old Vic' below) but it once lead down to the docks at Welsh Back, where the old sailing trows (a type of sailing barge) used to dock after their journeys from South Wales. The street has changed little since those days, and the Llandoger Trow pub dates back to 1663. It is rumoured to have been patronised by pirates of old, and by Robert Louis Stevenson whilst writing Treasure Island.

103km

51.4518-2.5946

M Shed

History of Bristol

103km

51.4473-2.5986

Pero's Bridge

Bridge over the Harbour, known for the iconic counter weights of the lifting section which resemble the shape of movie character Shrek, hence its popular name with the locals. Its formal name Pero's Bridge is a reference to Pero Jones, a Caribbean slave who arrived in Bristol through the harbour channel below the bridge in the 18th. Although the bridges hydraulic mechanism allows it to open and close swiftly, it only does so rarely because the ferry was designed explicitly to pass under the bridge without it needing to be lifted.

103km

51.4501-2.5979

Great Bristol Half Marathon

104km

51.4508-2.5986

Bristol Cathedral

Built as the abbey of St Augustine founded in the Norman era, and extensively rebuilt in the 16th and 19th centuries. The seat of the diocese of Bristol.

104km

51.4517-2.6007

Red Lodge Museum, Bristol

The house was built in 1590 and then altered in 1730. It has fine oak panelling and carved stone chimney pieces and is furnished in the style of both periods. The garden has now been laid out in Elizabethan style.

104km

51.455556-2.599583

Georgian House, Bristol

Built for merchant and plantation owner John Pinney in 1790, also the former home of Pero Jones, a slave brought to Bristol from Nevis, by Pinney. It is displayed as it might have looked in the 18th century and provides an insight into life above and below stairs. Free. The book Pero, the Life of a Slave in Eighteenth-Century Bristol (C Eickelmann and D Small) is for sale at the museum.

104km

51.4526-2.6044

Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery

Bristol's major museum and art gallery houses an outstanding and diverse range of objects, from sea dinosaurs to magnificent art. A visit to the region's largest museum and art gallery is guaranteed to inspire! A range of subjects can be found. From Archaeology to History and Art. It also has a cafe.

104km

51.4561-2.6053

Brandon Hill, Bristol

This attractive and hilly park is worth visiting, if only for the views over Bristol from the hill-top. Even better views can be gained by climbing the narrow spiral staircase within the Cabot Tower atop the hill. Open every day from 8AM to 30 min before dusk. The tower is now open again after being closed for significant structural maintenance.

104km

51.45291-2.6068

SS Great Britain

The world's first iron hulled, screw propeller-driven, steam-powered passenger liner, built by Brunel in 1843 and now preserved in a dry-dock alongside the floating harbour. Winner of the Gulbenkian Prize for Museum of the Year 2006 - the biggest arts prize in the U.K. The "Being Brunel" exhibition alongside opened in 2018 and is included in the ticket price.

104km

51.4492-2.6084

Cabot Tower, Bristol

This dramatic Victorian tower occupies a prominent hilltop in Brandon Hill park, seen from much of the city. If you climb up the spiral staircase, you get a great view of the whole city from the top. There are signs which show you what you are looking at. It's a great way to get acquainted with the city and oriented to where you are.

104km

51.454-2.6068

The Lido, Bristol

A Grade II* listed building. The Lido and pub are separately managed, the historic Lido having closed in 1989, completely refurbished and reopened in 2008. The Victoria freehouse pub stands in one corner of the site; it was created in 1851 to provide the funds to rescue the Lido the first time, and was saved from closure in 2006.

105km

51.4589-2.6117

Clifton Cathedral

A striking modernist design completed in 1973, with an equally modern interior and spire. It is constructed of reinforced concrete faced with granite. Worth a look.

106km

51.4597-2.6163

Bristol Zoo

It is the 5th oldest zoo in the world and the oldest outside of a capital city. It was awarded ‘Zoo of the Year 2004’ by the Good Britain Guide.

106km

51.46333333-2.62222222

Clifton Observatory

The Downs provide a huge open space within Bristol, with great views over the Avon Gorge and the suspension bridge. On top of the downs, right by the bridge is the Observatory, housing a camera obscura and a cave leading down towards an observation point within the 250-foot sheer cliff face of the gorge.

106km

51.45663-2.6264

Clifton Suspension Bridge

bridge spanning the Avon Gorge and the River Avon

107km

51.4549-2.6279

Leigh Woods National Nature Reserve

A wilderness of beauty and tranquility set against the breathtaking backdrop of the Avon Gorge and Brunel's world famous suspension bridge (National Trust).

108km

51.4631-2.6392

Ashton Court

850 acres (340 hectares) city park, less than 2 mi (3.2 km) from the city centre, with a mix of meadow, woodland, deer park, golf course, site of the Balloon Fiesta, the KIte Festival and the former Ashton Court Festival.

108km

51.4479-2.6446

Aldershot

town in Hampshire, UK

119km

51.248-0.758

Tintern

village in the United Kingdom

120km

51.69677-2.68142

Jurassic Coast

World Heritage Site in England

134km

50.70555556-2.99

Windsor, Berkshire

140km

51.4791-0.6095

Eton, Berkshire

140km

51.4881-0.6092

Monmouthshire

principal area in south-east Wales

141km

51.78333333-2.86666667

we will see

Christchurch (England)

United Kingdom
Christchurch is a town in Dorset, famed for its millennium-old Priory, of which the town derives its name from.

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